All events are free and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, the events take place in
the Ottinger Room at the Croton Free Library, 171 Cleveland Drive, Croton-on-Hudson, NY. Please join us!

 

OCTOBER

 Detail of a hand-drawn U.S. Coast Survey map of Croton Point (then called Teller's point) in 1854.

Detail of a hand-drawn U.S. Coast Survey map of Croton Point (then called Teller's point) in 1854.

The History of Croton Point

If you explore Croton Point today you’ll see the “oyster middens” on the northern tip, refuse from the Native Americans who once had a stockaded settlement where the model airplane field is today. You’ll see thousands of discarded bricks along the shoreline and on the south side the boarded-up entrances to vaulted wine cellars. It’s hard to imagine that a major brickmaking operation transformed the landscape of Croton Point or that it was once the location of the first commercial vineyard in New York State. 

Marc Cheshire and Carl Oechsner will tell the fascinating story of Croton Point—from the time of the first Native American settlements (dating back 7,000 years) to capping the Westchester County garbage dump. We’ll learn the whispered tales of witches who once guarded Captain Kidd’s buried treasure, how the cannons fired at the British ship Vulture led to the capture of Major John André and the extensive plans by the county to transform Croton Point into Playland West.

Thursday, October 4 at 7:00 p.m.


NOVEMBER

Potter 1.jpg

From Cottages to Castles

Historic Houses on the Hudson

Marc Shenfield is a painter, student of Hudson River history and former advertising creative. He moved to a historic home in Croton-on-Hudson from a brownstone in Brooklyn in 1974. His presentation will focus on lesser-known examples of houses in Westchester, Putnam and Dutchess Counties, a few homes on the river’s western shore, plus unusual views of better-known sites. Emphasis will be on the history and architecture as well as the longer historic and cultural context.

Thursday, November 1 at 7:00 p.m.


DECEMBER

 Detail from A Plan of West Point by Jean Louis Ambroise de Genton, the Chevalier de Villefranche.

Detail from A Plan of West Point by Jean Louis Ambroise de Genton, the Chevalier de Villefranche.

The Chain That Saved the Colonies

To stop the British invasion of the New England colonies during the American Revolution, Peter Townsend manufactured a Great Chain for the Continental Army at Sterling Forest. It was placed across the Hudson River at West Point because the river narrowed there and—combined with other factors such as winds, tides and current—forced ships to slowly navigate the passage and therefore make them better targets for the colonial shore batteries.

Donald “Doc” Bayne will share the history of the iron industry that started in 1736 at Sterling Forest and how the Sterling Forge was used to create the Great Chain. Doc is the assistant park and recreation supervisor and acting environmental education director at Sterling Forest State Park. He is also the president of the Friends of Sterling Forest.

Thursday, December 6 at 7:00 p.m.